Classical!

From bands to orchestral to pop music! Shoobie doobie doo wop!! Talk about...... pop pop pop music!!!
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vrikasatma
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Classical!

Post by vrikasatma »

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Post by Morkulv »

I kinda like classical music. I recently listened a lot to Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata and I even made a small cover of it (see also the "too much spare time"-topic in the non-were section). Songs like that I really enjoy, but I overall love piano-solo's to begin with.
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Post by Wan »

Well, I personally like many kinds of music. Obviously I have a strong tendency to electronic-like music, but I also often listen to Classical Music, since it's (as vrikasatma said) a mix of feelings... you have to listen it well to feel it =D
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Post by Morkulv »

Well, I personally also love symphonic black metal a lot (see black metal-topic). Black metal in combination with symphonic orchestra, gives a really nice atmosphere.
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Classical for people accustomed to rock

Post by Scott Gardener »

A good Classical set for people used to rock albums is Gustav Holst's The Planets. Each piece is a single movement (i.e., like a song) about 6-9 minutes in length, and with seven tracks, the whole thing flows like an album. It's also a must for sci-fi fans, because it's been so influential to sci-fi scores. "Mars: the Bringer of War" influenced maybe a third to a half of all music ever played when spaceships shoot at each other, and "Jupiter: the Bringer of Jolllity" is perfect5 music for pulling your starship out of drydock and going to warp by.

Another great classical piece for rock fans is Stravinski's "The Rite of Spring." Siouxsie Sioux of Siouxsie and the Banshees took liberally from it, her signature Goth mascara drawn directly from that of the sacrificial maiden of this controversial work. The piece premiered back in 1913, marketed as a ballet but instead being a very experimental art piece that turned musical conventions on their head and practically sparked a riot. It was the heavy metal concert of the time, except that people went in expecting something more akin to Brittney Spears.

Disney's Fantasia and Fantasia 2000 are great movies, both taking classical works and making animated "music videos" that range from amusing to dreamlike and surreal.
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Post by vrikasatma »

Another accessible artist is Johann Strauss, Jr. — indeed, the whole Strauss family. "On The Beautiful Blue Danube" — aka "Blue Danube Waltz" — is just one, and not a particularly juicy one. There's better.

Waltzes were the dirty dancing of the 1800s, they actually banned it in Vienna for a time! Critics of waltzing were worried about couples embracing closely and, in the "more shadowy parts of the dance floors," actually kissing and embracing! :scream: Keep in mind that the courtly dances of earlier times had men and women dancing separately and <i>never</i> facing each other. The waltz ended that. The dancers were coupled off and in very close proximity to each other, sweeping around the floor. The music went on and on, for twenty minutes sometimes.

Visualize your sweetie belly-to-belly with you, circling around each other and around the dance floor for twenty minutes, and you'll see why waltzing was considered so scandalous back then :D
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Claassical

Post by RedEye »

To start out with, I think I've bought almost every Deutsche Grammophon recording there is: even the bad ones are good!
Handel (George Fredric): wrote some incredible stuff, mostly operas and the occasional background piece for King George Version 3 ( :lol: ). MOst people only know him for his Messiah- wasteful; since he wrote so much more good music that almost nobody listens to.
BEETHOVEN! Every symphony; and most of his other works, including Fidelio; his only opera. It's amazing that one person was more or less the entire Classical movement in music-he's sort of like Boring-oops Barry Manilow in that respect.
Mozart: Incredible! Note- he was tail-end Baroque and beginning Classical in his writing, which gives his works a distinctly unique feeling. His Requiem Mass in D minor is still the reference point for classical religious works, and is a heckuva trance piece as well. He's also one of the most "Borrowed from" composers who ever lived.
Bach, J.S. and Bach, C.E; father and son wrote some of the most moving Baroque compositions ever.
Ravel: Bolero is only one of his compositions. The others are better.
and...
Vivaldi, Antonio: His "Four Seasons" were in many ways the start of secular music in Europe, as well as the start of modern "Symphonic Orchestras". Prior to his works, En Suite groups of performers were small and usually had one Master-the rest were there to back him up. Vivaldi changed that, and we have Symphonies today as a direct result.

There are Chopin, Lalique, Brahms, Scarlatti...no wonder I don't have any money these days....
And America's donation to Classical Music? Ragtime...Scott Joplin, W.C. Handy & Co. are what you'll find in Classical Music from the U.S.

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Re: Classical!

Post by Goliathe Dark »

I haven't been a fan of classical until about six months ago after being enlightened by my local radio network.

Now, whenever I see two contrastingly-hilarious people fighting, I hear La Dona e Mobile in my head.

I don't really know the names of many of the songs or artists so I would be much abliged if someone could help load up my Mp3 with ideas.
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Re: Classical for people accustomed to rock

Post by lycanthropeful »

Scott Gardener wrote:A good Classical set for people used to rock albums is Gustav Holst's The Planets. Each piece is a single movement (i.e., like a song) about 6-9 minutes in length, and with seven tracks, the whole thing flows like an album. It's also a must for sci-fi fans, because it's been so influential to sci-fi scores. "Mars: the Bringer of War" influenced maybe a third to a half of all music ever played when spaceships shoot at each other, and "Jupiter: the Bringer of Jolllity" is perfect5 music for pulling your starship out of drydock and going to warp by.

Another great classical piece for rock fans is Stravinski's "The Rite of Spring."
Both of those works are some of my favorites. I've had the privilege of performing an arrangement of Holst's Jupiter, and it was a wonderful moment in my life (Mars and Mercury are my other favorite movements). If you like Holst, also check out his 1st Suite in E Flat for Military Band. That's one of my favorite works of all time!

Stravinsky's music is just powerful and emotional... I love The Rite of Spring.
Goliathe Dark wrote:I don't really know the names of many of the songs or artists so I would be much abliged if someone could help load up my Mp3 with ideas.
Here are some suggestions:
- Gustav Holst's The Planets Suite
- Holst's 1st Suite in E Flat for Military Band, or 2nd Suite in F for Military Band
- Anything by Aaron Copland, specifically Fanfare For the Common Man (you'll recognize it, they play it at the Olympics quite often) or music from his Rodeo Suite
- Maurice Ravel's Bolero, or Pavane For a Dead Princess (also sometimes called Pavane For a Dead Infant or whatever the French title is)
- Camille Saint-Saens' Danse Bacchanale (commonly known as the "snake charmer song", but that melody is part of a much bigger piece from the opera Samson and Delilah, where the music is played in an orgy scene :o), or Pas Redoble (a really entertaining and fast-paced march type of piece)

Also, if you're looking for great contemporary composers, check out some of my favorites: Samuel R. Hazo, David Holsinger, Frank Ticheli, Eric WHitacre (he also does absolutely breathtaking choral work: YouTube Lux Aurumque), Claude T. Smith, Malcolm Arnold (epic Scottish music! Four Scottish Dances is a great starting piece), Richard Saucedo, and Robert W. Smith.
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Re: Classical!

Post by vrikasatma »

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Re: Classical!

Post by Baphnedia »

I'm just going to not say anything... being a classical musician, it's just more fun to hear and watch it get discussed. Woohoo! Or something.
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